Concurrent Scientific Session (Mass Spectrometry): Emerging Technologies to Bring Glycoproteomics within Reach

Abstracts

Emerging Technologies to Bring Glycoproteomics Within Reach

Track:

The NIH Common Fund Glycoscience program develops accessible and affordable new tools for carbohydrate analysis, informatics, and synthesis. The program emphasizes straightforward technologies responsive to needs expressed by end user groups from multiple fields. Validation and usability testing in partnering labs ensures that tools are accessible to non-specialists. This session will describe tools emerging from the Glycoscience program and explain how resource facilities can access those tools and bring them in-house. Our goal is for resources to broaden their impact in glycomics, glycoproteomics, and glycoscience generally, through adoption of straightforward, reliable synthetic, analytical, and informatics tools that we are developing. Three speakers will describe tools emerging from the Glycoscience program, in three categories: (1) glycan analysis, including mass spectrometric techniques for structure determination and glycoproteomics; (2) glycan synthesis; and (3) glycoinformatics. Analytical technologies to be described include:  high throughput permethylation of glycopeptides via one-pot for site mapping and glycan analysis, Isotope-targeted glycoproteomics (IsoTaG), a mass-independent chemical glycoproteomics technique for profiling glycopeptides, identifying both N- and O-glycan structures and sites of attachment in complex samples (www.IsoStamp.org); facile methods to ultra purify glycans; software tools for building 3D models of glycoproteins and predicting the 3D structure of glycans (https://dev.glycam.org/); a wide range of highly versatile glycan affinity reagents, including sialoglycan-recognizing probes; and new photo-crosslinking probes for discovery of the interaction partners of O-GlcNAc modified proteins. Chemical and enzymatic schemes for the facile automated synthesis of carbohydrates (N- linked, O-linked, human milk, GAGs, glycolipids) are available to core facilities to bring in-house using existing instrumentation or new low-cost modular automation platforms. Glycoinformatics tools and methods are being developed in a community-based effort, integrating them with well-established genomic and proteomic databases and tools at NCBI and EBI. The project involves 10 teams in 5 countries. Glycoinformatics tools and data are already available (http://www.glygen.org/).

Authors:
  • Douglas M. Sheeley
    Author Email
    douglas.sheeley@nih.gov
    Institution
    National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research
  • Parastoo Azadi
    Author Email
    azadi@ccrc.uga.edu
    Institution
    University of Georgia
  • Nicola L. Pohl
    Author Email
    npohl@indiana.edu
    Institution
    Indiana University